tennis elbow flexbar

 

With the advancement of technology, many health related problems and injuries which normally took years to recover from can now be treated much quicker.

One of the more frustrating injuries that continues to affect more and more people each and every year is tennis elbow.

Again thanks to research and development, there is fantastic new product on the market called the tennis elbow flexbar which has been proven to work time and time again.

And the best part…

It doesn’t matter how long you’ve had tennis elbow or whether you are in the acute or chronic phase of your injury.

So what is a flex bar for tennis elbow anyway?

The flexbar was created by a company called Performance Health Brands, which is the creator and maker of the Theraband Flexbar.

This product was created after a study performed by Tim Tyler PT who had patients in a tennis elbow trial use a solid rubber bar(flexible enough to twist) to perform eccentric exercises in order to better their injury.

In the past, the only way to do eccentric exercises as a rehab movement/treatment for tennis elbow was on a $50, 000 machine in a Physical Therapy Clinic or Hospital.

The study that led to the popularity of the flexbar, enlisted 21 patients who had been suffering from tennis elbow for longer than 6 weeks and hadn’t undergone surgery.

All 21 patients were given traditional treatments such as these tennis elbow stretching techniques, cross fiber friction massage, ultrasound and heat/ice therapy.

Then half the group were given the flexbar so they could do eccentric wrist extension exercises for their injured arm.

This involved twisting the rubber bar with their uninjured arm and then slowly untwist the bar with their injured arm.

So for example, if your elbow pain is in your right arm, you would hold the bar parallel to the floor with your arms extended and twist forward with your left hand.

Then you would “untwist” and resist the bar with your affected arm, your right wrist/hand.

And when I say slowly, I mean untwisting took 4 seconds.

Below is a pic that shows you exactly how to use the flex bar:

flexbar for tennis elbow instructions

 

They were instructed by the researchers to do 15 repetitions for 3 sets each day for seven weeks.

The results of the trial were overwhelmingly conclusive and positive!

The group that used the flexbar saw an 81% improvement in pain versus just 22% for the group who stuck with traditional treatment only.

Even better for the group that used the device was the tenderness on the outside of their elbow also decreased!

You may be wondering …

How does the tennis elbow flexbar work and why is it so effective?

The answer lies in the density of the rubber of the bar combined with the eccentric negative movement in which you perform the motion.

Combined that with the fact that there were no side effects of using the bar and tennis elbow sufferers can do this simple exercise at home, at anytime.

Win – Win!

This device had been made to put up with abuse.

It’s made of durable, flexible rubber with ribs running along it’s length to help improve grip, even with sweaty, wet hands.

Not only does it help improve the strength in your forearm extensor muscles but it helps improve your grip strength as well.

A weak grip is a sign and symptom of tennis elbow, in case you didn’t already know.

The flexbar comes in four different colours, each with a different resistance levels.

The easiest to bend and twist is the yellow one.

Then it is the red, followed by the green and then the blue.

The yellow only requires 6lbs of force in order to use properly.

The red requires 10lbs of force, green 15lbs of force and blue is the toughest – it requires 25lbs of force.

I would recommend that you start out with the red flexbar and then progress each month onto the green and then the blue.

Here is a quick little instructional video tutorial on how to use it:

So where is the best place to purchase your flexbar for tennis elbow?

If you want your bar really fast combined with a 100% money back guarantee, you can purchase one right here.

But here’s the thing:

Now that you know that this device is effective when it comes treating tennis elbow but…

It can take up to 7 weeks for your elbow to respond and your elbow is still not 100% better.

Do you really want to wait that long?

Want to know the fastest and quickest way to heal your tennis elbow?

Combine the flex bar with a proven, in home treatment program and you have the complete solution!

So no washing down handfuls of pain medication each day, forget having to wear a bulky elbow brace or strap, never worry about having to endure painful cortisone injections or countless visits to your Doctor or Physiotherapist.

I am talking about a simple, easy-to-follow home treatment system where all you need to do is watch the video and perform simple movements, every other day.

And the best part is that it literally only takes 4 minutes to do.

Do them in your office or while sitting at home on your couch watching TV.

Yes it’s that easy!

The program I am referring too doesn’t require you to purchase a flexbar if you don’t want to.

How great is that!

Everything you need to have success with this program, you already have in your home or perhaps in your garage.

OK, all you really need is a water bottle and a hammer.

Yes a hammer!

Sounds strange doesn’t it?

Listen I assure you, you won’t be beating your arm with the hammer!

It is simple a “tool” to help accelerate your recovery time.

But that’s not all!

There are just 5 simple steps that you have to follow, which are all laid out for you as if you were doing paint by numbers.

This treatment program works regardless how severe your injury is or how long you’ve had it.

Have I peaked your interest?

If so, when you click on the button below, a short video will reveal to you not only the 5 steps but educate you on tennis elbow and explain where the majority of individuals go wrong when trying to cure their condition.

Go there now and see just how easy it is to overcome your tennis elbow injury at home.

learn more

 

 

Comments are closed.